Coronavirus rates are surging in Paris and the surrounding region, according to the French regional health authority.

France is trying to control a second wave of Covid-19, with cases rising nationally.

The Ile-de-France region, which includes the French capital, has reported 156.8 cases of diseases per 100,000 people. In Paris itself, that rate increases to 254 cases per 100,000.

France has established three tests for declaring a “zone of maximum alert” in an area.

The city of Paris has already met the threshold for the first test, which is if the incidence rate reaches 250 cases per 100,000 people.

The second criteria is whether 30% of ICU capacity is occupied by Covid-19 patients. The health authority said 344 beds were currently occupied by coronavirus patients in the region. This accounts for 30.7% of total ICU beds.

The third criteria is the incidence rate of the virus among the elderly. The regional health authority says that number is now at 94.5 per 100,000 inhabitants, with 100 per 100,000 being the trigger level.

While the Paris region remains in dangerous territory, France’s Marseille region is already on maximum alert — meaning bars and restaurants have had to close.

French Prime Minister Jean Castex is meeting representatives of bars and restaurants Tuesday, who are protesting tougher restrictions for their establishments.

“We monitor the indicators; If the situation in a territory deteriorates too much, it is our responsibility to take measures to curb the epidemic and protect the population, in conjunction with local elected officials,” the Prime Minister’s office told CNN.
“For the moment the thresholds in Paris have not been crossed, but we remain extremely attentive to the evolution of the indicators.” 
“So far, no area has been placed in the highest possible category, ‘State of Emergency.'” 

France has reported 581,821 Covid-19

Source: CNN

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